Leveraging AI

31 | From Weeks to Minutes: An AI-Powered Step-by-Step Blueprint to Radically Boost Marketing Efficiency, with Ashley Gross, head of Global Campaigns at Commercetools

September 26, 2023 Isar Meitis and Ashley Gross Season 1 Episode 30
Leveraging AI
31 | From Weeks to Minutes: An AI-Powered Step-by-Step Blueprint to Radically Boost Marketing Efficiency, with Ashley Gross, head of Global Campaigns at Commercetools
Show Notes Transcript


Are You "AI-ming" for Exceptional Customer Relationships?

In a world swamped with data, algorithms, and impersonal interactions, how do you make your brand truly connect? This episode of Leveraging AI with Ashley Gross is more than just a podcast; it's a masterclass in relationship-building in the age of AI.

You’ll learn:

✅ How to identify your ideal attendees and buyers
✅ Ashley’s step-by-step framework for event planning with AI
✅ Tools like Jasper to generate ideas and copy
✅ Prompting best practices to get stellar results fast
✅ Real examples and sample prompts from Ashley

Discover how Ashley uses AI to uncover shared interests between prospects and instantly plans relevant events they’ll love. 💡

You’ll be amazed by how quickly AI can automate relationship-building activities like event planning. No more wasted weeks or manpower! 💪 Learn from a master and implement Ashley’s tactics to connect with customers in entirely new ways. Let the AI planning magic begin!

Checkout Ashley's Live notes here

About Leveraging AI

If you’ve enjoyed or benefited from some of the insights of this episode, leave us a five-star review on your favorite podcast platform, and let us know what you learned, found helpful, or liked most about this show!

Isar Meitis:

Hello and welcome to Leveraging AI. This is Isar, Meitis, your host, and I've got an amazing show for you today. This is a recording of one of our Thursday noon live shows that we do with incredible practitioners who do absolute magic with AI in this particular case, Ashley Gross walks us through a step by step process, including the tools, the prompts, and every single thing that she's doing in order to build relationships with her target audience through live events And she's going to take us through the entire process from the very beginning. That includes identifying the target audience and defining a target persona and finding them on LinkedIn and finding the stuff that they care about and topics that will be interested in and defining events and so on and so forth. It's a process that used to take a team of a few people a few weeks to put together and Ashley is going to walk us through the entire process in a single hour. It's absolute magic. At the end of the episode, as always, I will share some big news that happened this week, and there are a lot of really big news that happened this week. So stay put, but now let's dive into how to build relationships for businesses with right people, Using generative AI and shortening the process from weeks to a single hour. hello everyone and welcome to another exciting Thursday live edition of Leveraging ai, the podcast that shares practical, ethical ways to leverage ai, improve efficiency, grow your business, and advance your career. I have an incredible, amazing show for you today, and the reason for that is, historically, if we could improve a process by. 5% or 10%, that would be amazing. And if you could do it in 20%, that would be considered a really big thing for any company out there. But now with AI capabilities, we can really break the boundaries of everything that was standard when it comes to defining the efficiencies that we can achieve in different processes. And we can take a process that used to take weeks and sometimes months with a few people and squeeze it into an hour of a single person. Now, this sounds too good to be true, but what we're gonna do in the show today is exactly that. We're gonna take you through a process. And that process is actually very unique to the overall AI thing. And what I mean by that is human relationships has always been critical for the success of any business, especially a B2B business. Now with ai, that becomes even more important because almost everybody will be able to do the day-to-day. Pretty freaking well. So what's gonna set you apart is the human relationships that you can set. The problem is that building human relationships at scale takes a lot of time. You need to find the target companies and you need to find the decision makers in those companies. And you need to find something that they like and that they wanna know about and connect with the people that are there somehow. And then potentially if you can dis design events around where these people are and the things they actually care about and find value in so you can build relationships with those people. What I just said is a lot of work for a bunch of different people. That usually takes weeks to months, and that's why too many companies don't do that. And the companies who do usually do this once or twice a year or maybe once a quarter, and that's it because it's a lot of work. But the reality is that there's magic within ai and. The person that's gonna help us with unveiling this magic. The magician behind the curtain if you want for today is Ashley Gross. Now Ashley is an expert marketer. She is the head of global campaign marketing at commerce Tools. But in addition to that, she's just a marketing guru and an AI lover and geek like me, which makes her the perfect person to share how she does that magic with us. And so we are gonna walk today through the exact process that Ashley has been using to put together events live with people based on handpicked people, on handpicked topics that, again, used to take weeks of a team to do. And we are gonna do that with Ashley in this next hour. So I'm crazy excited about this. I'm sure everybody else is. Ashley, welcome to Leveraging ai.

Ashley Gross:

Thank you. I love that intro. I'm

Isar Meitis:

a musician. it's all you. I, I didn't make everything up. it's all real. So let's really start at the beginning. Sure. Which is, when did you figure out that this is even possible?

Ashley Gross:

Yeah, so sometime during the pandemic, I'm sure everyone can relate. That's we just go off of like the pandemic and that's, two to three year span. It's all kind of a blur, so it's somewhere in there. I started dabbling around with AI and then I just started integrating it and found out that if you put AI at the center of everything that you need to do, your productivity increases your thunking instead of thinking decreases and. I really just started running with it and now I, I use AI in every single thing I do. I love experimenting with it to see what I can improve on and the functionalities and yeah, I just, I love it. It's a lot of

Isar Meitis:

fun. Awesome. so let's dive to the practical stuff. Yeah, absolutely. How do we make the magic happen? What are the steps of the process that you are taking and what are the tools that you're using in order to make this

Ashley Gross:

thing work? Yep. So for this session, I'm gonna be using Jasper, which is what you're looking at right now. I will spend a few minutes just kind of going through so you can get a look of look and feel for what Jasper is and everything that it can do. And then I'll break down, my process, if you will. And, we'll dive right in. So this is Jasper. Oh, sorry. Just

Isar Meitis:

before we, we do this, for those of you who are gonna listen to this after the fact in a podcast, we will try to describe as much as possible what's on the screen. It's also gonna be on YouTube, so if you wanna watch everything, we'll put in the show notes, the link to the YouTube thing so you can watch the whole thing. but if not, you just know that you need to join us live next time so you can see everything

Ashley Gross:

that we're doing. Yes. And I give away my prompts so there's no gatekeeping.

Isar Meitis:

we'll put those in the show notes as well.

Ashley Gross:

Awesome. Okay. So one of my favorite reasons that I love Jasper is because of all the flexibility it offers. So just to give you an idea of all the templates that you can use, remixes, the newer feature that I love. So it remixes any piece of content into different forms. So if you have a short blog, you can turn into a long blog, you can turn into a talk track for webinar. You think it, you can do it. but there's also so many other templates, I find myself using, explain it to a child quite frequently. being in the technology space, it's always good to rethink the way that we market materials based on our audience. the frequently asked question generator is another one of my favorites. feature to benefit provides just the value propositions, which is super helpful when you're talking to C-level executives. Just to give you a glimpse into why I love Jasper. this is it. But for today, we're just going to be using the chat feature of this, just for practicality reasons and try to simplify this into one template. So I'm briefly going to go over my fake company and my fake product that I created just for this demonstration. And then I'm going to show you how to season your AI prompt. If you don't know what seasoning means, it just means how to get, I would say more so providing context to your AI so that you really set the tone for what you're expecting. from there I'm gonna take you through a workflow for creating target personas, creating a list of potential contacts to reach out to. Tailoring messaging for those personas based on their individual KPIs challenges, and then ending with an event planning session where I added LinkedIn profiles and have the AI create an event based on shared similar interests and hobbies and shared geographical locations.

Isar Meitis:

As I mentioned, pure magic. let's

Ashley Gross:

dive in. Awesome. Okay, so I am going to go over here to my hypothetical situation and copy this in. so my company is called Innotech Solutions, and they create a smart link, which basically takes all of your smart devices that exist in your home or your business, and they put it on one connectivity so that you have a one powerhouse that controls everything, all of your apps. so all I'm doing is feeding the ai, my company and my brand. And then if I wanna enhance the prompt, I'm just going to say, this is my company and my product. Do you understand? I like to start with this because it's super simple. you're just asking it to repeat back to you what you just put in. So it says, yes, I understand you're the owner of Intertech Solutions and you're introducing your new product. Smart Link. Great. It understands what I'm doing. So then what I'm gonna do next,

Isar Meitis:

I wanna pause you just for one second. Yes. That's a very important point that I wanna generalize for anybody who's doing anything with AI on any platform. By the way, ChaTGPT, Claude, Jasper, any other, it's a step that a lot of people miss, and what I even go a step beyond that. I'm like, ask me any additional questions on information you wanna know in order to achieve your task. That's usually my first step of a bigger process. And then it asks me questions and it's usually great questions that, of stuff that I forgot to mention, and then I just answer them just like I would answer a questionnaire. I'm like, okay, here's your first question. Here's my answers. Your first, and then you really set up the AI for success in what you wanna do by giving it information it feels it needs extra. So this is a very important step in any big thing you wanna do with ai.

Ashley Gross:

Thank you. That's a great point. I like to take it a step further because not all of my ideas are great ideas. I know I was referred to as a magician, but sometimes I am also guilty of thunking. So just because I personally came up with this company name and product, I'm gonna go ahead and ask it a different prompt. I'm going to say, explain this product to me like I'm a child. This is basically going to rehearse if this product makes sense and if we're talking about it in the right context. So again, I'm contextualizing the AI to contextualize my product back to me. This is really long, so I'm not gonna go through and read it line by line. But basically it says it's a magical device that connects all your smart gadgets and makes them work together like best friends. Love that. Just imagine your phone, tablet, tv, and even your cool smartwatch all talking to each other and helping you in amazing ways. That's exactly what I wanted to do. So now I understand that it understands what I'm trying to do. so moving on from that, we have seasoned it. You can continue to season it if you want. another reason I like Jasper is if you want it to improve your content for you, all you do is thumbs up it or thumbs down it or just try it again. That's it. I know with ChatGPT and a couple other ones not to knock other ais, but it takes a little bit more work seasoning them I think that this is a better tool for marketers and sales in general just because of the ease of use.

Isar Meitis:

so two things about that. One, first of all, we drop the link to Jasper in the chat if you wanna go and find it. And we're gonna put it in the show notes for those who are listening to the podcast afterwards. But in addition, this is, you heard a lot probably about training, a large language model. And really this is a very user, simple user interface to train the model. It tell you, oh, you did a good job, or, no, you didn't do a good job. Which gives it feedback, which tells it, yes, this is going the right direction. Now think about doing this within the context of a business where you have 5, 10, 20 people using this daily, very quickly. The model understands what the company tone is, what it's trying to do, what's good or bad, and then it just becomes better and better over time, which makes the total outcome even more efficient.

Ashley Gross:

Exactly. So it has my company, it has my product. It understands what I'm trying to do. It understands how to market it. Now I need to know who my target personas are for this product. So the prompt I'm feeding it is act as a marketer. Determine the target audience for the upcoming release of the SmartLink product you are promo promoting. Start by identifying the genre's, themes, and unique selling propositions of the product. Research the demographics. find out who would most be interested based on age, gender, location, education, and income. And then consider the media channels. I always try to provide context into every single prompt. I don't just stop with seasoning because if I, if it knows the role that it's supposed to take, then I can better, personalize what I'm trying to teach it. It provided me a marketing strategy, media channels, and demographics, as well as target audience. So for the purpose of not reading back to you guys what you can see on the screen, I'm just gonna briefly go over this. So the unique selling propositions are the seamless integration, the intuitive control, the smart automation, and the customizable experiences. I would agree the target audience, tech savvy, millennials, and young professionals. I would also agree the demographics I'm also going to agree with. and then the location, urban dwellers, tech hubs, and metropolitan areas. So then if we go down to media channels and content formats, social media, tech, blogs and websites, influencer partnerships, online ads, live demonstrations. the marketing strategy I didn't necessarily ask it for, but I still like it. The bottom line was I got my target personas, so now I'm going to act. It already did it for me, but, keep in mind I've been using Jasper for, again, somewhere between the three, three and a half year mark. So it might look a little bit different for you guys just because you haven't worked with it as much. so I'm taking the extra step. I'm gonna pretend like it didn't gimme a marketing strategy and I'm gonna say act as a marketing strategist and develop three distinct buyer personas For my target audience who would be interested in purchasing this, I ask them about specific job roles, industries, and company size of the target audience as well. And then I wanna know what their daily pain points and KPIs are for them in their roles so that I know how to market my product to them Just purely focusing on the value proposition. So it provided me three. So for the tech enthusiast, I would focus on software engineers, industries, technology, mid-sized to large tech companies. Their goals are to stay up to date with the latest tech trends, enhance productivity and streamlined processes. I absolutely agree with that. Their challenges would be integrating multiple smart devices, managing complex automation setups, and finding efficient control solutions. And their KPIs that their bosses measure them on are improved efficiency, reduction in time spent on manual tasks and enhanced device compatibility. I agree with all of these. I know that the other two are going to be correct, but just to go through them briefly. the busy professional marketing manager, goals, increased brand visibility, optimized marketing campaigns, streamlining processes. KPIs that they would be measured on would be improved campaign performance, increased r o i and streamlined marketing operations. This is actually me and my role, so I can definitely say that this is accurate. and then the last one is a homeowner. So something a little bit different. I would most likely say this is like a tertiary, so business analyst financial services KPIs, reduced energy costs, improved home security and enhanced living experiences. And they're responsible for analyzing data, identifying cost saving opportunities, and ensuring efficient resource allocation. Great. So

Isar Meitis:

I wanna pause you for one second to yes. Highlight a few important things. I think, the biggest mistake maybe that people have in concept about large language models is that they look at them as first and foremost content creation tools. And the reality is it's a way more powerful ideation and brainstorming tools than it is a content creation tool. It's still great in content creation, but yeah, there's other ways to do that. but the real amazing value is stuff like this. So brainstorming what we just got in seconds will take a team of people from a marketing team. Sometimes 3, 4, 5, 6 meetings of an hour until they agree on everything. Everything. They consider everything until they do the research and so on. And now we got it in a few seconds. Now is it perfect? Maybe not. But this could be the starting point of a brainstorming session that now we maybe last just one meeting because you ask it instead of for three options, you ask it for seven, you brainstorm the seven, you pick up the top three and you're ready to go. So now that we have that, what's the next step?

Ashley Gross:

Yeah, absolutely. Okay. So the next step is we're gonna create a list of a, just any list of number, eyes, of potential prospects to reach out to. So I'm going to copy in my next prompt and put it into Jasper. Okay. So this prompt says, act as a social media manager. Your task is to identify and generate a list of a hundred to 150 LinkedIn users who fall into the following three buyer personas. And it says decision makers. so executives, because I am going to plan an event. So I want the decision makers to be at this event. I'm actually going to take out LinkedIn and just say users in general. Perfect. And right now it is generating, Companies LinkedIn profiles. See I even took it out. It's good. it's gotten so good that it can predict what I'm gonna do next. So it provides it to me without me asking for it, which is equal parts exciting and terrifying. so it gave me the C-level executives, their target job titles, their LinkedIn profiles. they did not link them in here'cause I have not yet asked for it. and then the stakeholders. So now I'm actually going to go in and add the rest of the decision makers and go back to that same prompt. So I specifically did this, so that I didn't overwhelm it. Sometimes when you ask it for too many things, it hallucinates. so now you can see it's the same prompt. But instead of asking for just decision makers, I added business owners in and then product users and I left product blank.'cause if they're using SmartLink, I don't care how they're using it as long as they're using it. So I'm not limiting the creativity of this.

Isar Meitis:

So again, while this is loading, I'm gonna talk a little bit about the process here, because the process is really important when it comes to using LLMs for these kind of processes. First, what is that it's a very detailed sought after process, meaning these prompts that now looks as if Ash is just copying and pasting, oh, this is cool. This is a process that took her a while to develop and she's graceful enough to share with us. But in addition, from a process perspective, you have to have a clear, very detailed process that you can follow again and again to do different things. That tells the AI exactly what you want. And as you see what it returns, you can make yours better and better. Two things about that. One is experiment. Try stuff, see what you get. Once you get something, that is great, save it. Create a prompt library somewhere that is shared across the company. I use a tool called Magical, which is a Chrome extension that allows you to create short snippets that becomes into these full paragraphs that can be shared across the organization. And so now if anybody wants in the organization to follow it, Ashley's doing, it's okay, prompt number one to find the right target audience, and you click a button and it populates it and everybody will get the same great results that Ashley's getting. So that's a side tactical step on how this can work within a larger organization versus just us doing it right now in front of you. Sorry to stop you, but it's important thing. Go

Ashley Gross:

ahead. Don't be sorry. And yes, so that's why I have two browsers over here. So I actually already did this, you can save it once you like something. This is saved on Jasper for as long as I want it to be, so I don't have to go back. it saves the prompts that I work with, so it's just, they're in my favorites now, which is really nice. So this is the output that I got. Here's the list of the LinkedIn users. this is a fake company and a fake product. So in this situation they're not real, but I'm about to show you what a real scenario would look like. but it gives me the name, the title, the company, the overview, and then their LinkedIn profiles if these people existed for my non fake product. follow with me real quick here though. before I put in real LinkedIn users and generate to create an event, I wanna tailor my messaging based on the personas. So I'm actually gonna say act as an event marketer and craft personalized email limitations for each of the personas. Why I am doing this is because I want personalized outreach based on what their KPI's interests and challenges are. I'm also gonna say, consider the tone and style of the email as well as the value proposition in the specific benefit that will resonate with each persona. finally include a call to action and make it easy and straightforward for them to register for this event. So I'm setting the tone again for this event that I'm preparing for that. I don't even know what it's going to be or where it's going to be yet, but I'm making sure that my outreach is one accurate, two personalized, and three, I'm getting the right message in front of the right audience. So it gives me the email. Join us for an exclusive event. It's going to populate three responses because I had three different personas. So gimme a moment to scroll here. This looks great to me. leaves in the blanks. So this one, persona one. This is going to be, let's go back to the personas. What was my first persona?

Isar Meitis:

So again, while we're waiting for this, I'll explain what's happening to the people who are just listening. We just created, we, I take credit for this, Ashley Plus Jasper, just created an email that she'll be able to pop into a, any kind of email platform that she has that is personalized on two different verticals. One is the type of persona and the other is the kind of company and event that she's going to create. So when she sends it out, it's not like a vanilla email, but it looks like she wrote it specifically for that individual.

Ashley Gross:

Yep. So our persona one was tech enthusiasts, so I won't read the whole email, but basically, the way that they are marketing to the tech enthusiasts are, as a highly esteemed job title is blank, responsible for making pivotal decisions regarding the purchase and implementation of product would be SmartLink. Your presence at this event is crucial. Here's what you can expect. Again, we're talking to buyer persona one, which was tech enthusiasts. So gain valuable insights from renowned industry experts. Absolutely. They'll wanna go to that interactive panel discussions, participating in discussions with fellow decision makers, exchanging ideas and perspectives on pressing industry challenges. That definitely sounds like tech enthusiasts and then networking opportunities. Absolutely. I would agree. This is an email I had sent and it goes through the other two as well. So this is the marketing professional, inspiring success stories, expert workshops. Again, networking. I'm a marketer. I definitely have gone to workshops before for those reasons. and then the third one was homeowners, homeowner. Yeah. Yes. So product demos, homeowners love, product demos, interactive workshops, the networking opportunities. So yeah, I would say that they nailed the personas and the personalized outreach emails. So now that I have my personas and I know how I'm going to talk to'em and how I'm going to get them there, I'm going to research the event. So I'm actually going to take this prompt and I'll explain what it says. So I know just a little bit of context. I don't know where the event's going to be. I don't know exactly what it's going to cover. and I don't know who's going to be invited, so I'm starting completely at a zero. I have never timed myself trying to plan an event, but I will, I'm going to go ahead and go out on a limb and say it takes anywhere from two and a half to three weeks, sometimes a month, especially if I want a hundred to 150 decision makers c levels there, closer to a month. And I just wanna provide you with that context so that you can see how quickly this is done, in live time. So the prompt that I fed it is act in an event planner you've been tasked with organizing an event for, and I'm gonna input names, review their LinkedIn profiles. This is where you copy in the LinkedIn profiles, and identify three hobbies or interests that they all share. For each of those three, hobbies or interests, provide specific examples of similar activities that they have mentioned. So I'm asking the AI to go through their LinkedIn profiles, find a similar geographical location. So before this event, even kickstarts, it's an essential location to all of these attendees. I'm asking it to find hobbies and interests and commonalities between them so that I know what to revolve my event around. This is taking all the work out of it for me. I'm also, so that's what I mentioned, act as a location scout. and now I'm going to copy in the LinkedIn profiles, I cannot see who all is attending, but I did randomly pick a few LinkedIn profiles of attendees. So we're gonna see how accurate this is. And if you're one of the names that are listed, please feel free to let me know. Okay. So

Isar Meitis:

I'm gonna, you may actually launch this business eventually, right?

Ashley Gross:

So I copy the LinkedIn profiles, I don't technically need to do it again, but I do want to. Emphasize. So I asked it to act as an event planner up here and copied in the LinkedIn profiles, but then also I said review their LinkedIn profiles. So I am gonna copy it in twice, again, just to be very transparent with what I'm expecting it to do. And then here is what it generated. So if you're on this call, Mallory Phillips, Thomas McDonald, Debra Murphy, Andrew Anderson, and Larissa Mark Tier. these are the random names that I picked to be a part of this. So here are the activities. Again, feel free to let me know if these are inaccurate or accurate. I would love to know and I can regenerate them if they're not. Here we go. Photography, outdoor adventure, gourmet cuisine, location, scouting, a coastal retreat with advantages and disadvantages. Urban metropolis, again, advantage and disadvantage. And then countryside retreats. And then it actually gives me its opinion. So based on the considerations above. So it already went through the advantages and disadvantages and decided what was the best option for me so that I didn't have to, again, seconds and takes all the thinking out of it. It picked urban Metropolis, the advantages of easy accessibility, abundant accommodations, and a diverse range of attractions. And then, yeah, should you have any further questions or require additional information, please do not reach out. This is a travel manager. They get paid$150 per event to do this, and I just did it in seconds for free. This is amazing. I can regenerate it again if anybody's selected. I can't see the chat, but if anyone's in there saying, those are not hobbies, I like, I'm happy to regenerate this.

Isar Meitis:

I wanna say something as far as the overall process, and first of all, explain how insane this is and second. Generalize it to other processes that you can do today with similar platforms. So the first thing is, Ashley mentioned several different people that you would usually, either employees of the company or people that you would hire that are expert on something specific in order to do this entire process. So from the research of defining the client personas through the steps of then finding the actual people who would fit that persona within. In this case, we've done the whole us, but we could have identified, we just wanna do this around New York City or Texas or any other location Southwest. So you can define an area or a region or a city where you wanna do this, and then only look at profiles where you have offices or where you want to grow your new customer share or whatever. Whatever the case may be. It gives you a list of those people. Which would've been a while to create manually because you have to go through multiple, lists of people that you either buy or that you curate through LinkedIn on your own. And then you have to go and do the tedious work of finding what these people care about so you can find hobbies that they all share. Why? Because that's your attraction for the event. So yes, it's a business networking event, but what if all these people like to play pickleball and you can bring, one of the top 10 people in pickleball in the world to take her out. How is pickleball connected to the way they're successful in business? And now you have an awesome event because anybody who's on the list who cares about pickleball will most likely want to come to the event. I. Now there's the actual event planning of location and what you wanna do. And I think that's probably the next step, which is what's in the event itself, right?

Ashley Gross:

Yep. So schedule a conference and a common geographical location, which I'd already found and create an event with a budget experience. And the schedule, I'm going to show you its full potential, so I'm actually not going to limit it with budget, but this is really nice when you're on a tight budget like we all are all the time. I'm going to actually give it a bigger budget just for fun, just to see what all it comes up with. And then I'm gonna say the Metropolis area because that's what it recommended. that's all I'm gonna do. So this prompt is Acton as event player Plan, a professional development conference. For people in the, I'm gonna say technology industry with a budget of$150,000 in a metropolis area, which aims to attract high profile and emerging entrepreneurs. I'm saying start researching the most suitable venues with adequate space and amenities. Create a list of potential keynote speakers, panel members, and breakout session facilitators. Your event should include thought provoking discussions, interactive group activities, and hands-on product demonstrations. You can plug in your product here, or you can just leave it in parentheses if you're going to use it in a chat function like this, because it will remember it. I also asked it to create a detailed schedule for the event, including exact timings and locations to keep the event running smoothly. This is gonna be a hefty output, but this is it. This is the end game, so I like that it starts out with an email too. Save the date professional development. Here, I'll just let it finish thinking. Okay. All right, let's see if we agree with this. So save the day professional development conference for the technology industry. That's a little bland for my taste, so I'm probably gonna regenerate that. and they don't need to know my budget. So this is actually a great example.'cause this is a hallucination. It's not a great output. I expected a little bit more from the top here, but before I regenerate it, I'm gonna go through and see what we can expect. engaging keynote speakers. yeah, I asked it to do that. Interactive panel discussions, hands-on. All right, so this is not what I want. I'm gonna say irrelevant. I'm gonna submit and I'm gonna try it again.

Isar Meitis:

Now, I wanna take this to, again, the generalization of some of this stuff. You can do most of this, not all of this, on any other large language model. You can do this on cloud two. You can do this on, ChatGPT Bard, whatever you want on ChatGPT. A little trick that a lot of people don't know unless they've been listening to this podcast for a while. There is a very big difference in ChatGPT and in any model, whether you ask the question again, meaning you just try to correct it and run it again, versus if you regenerate the same response. And the way to do this in ChatGPT, there's a little pencil button next to the chat that you, next to the prompt that you write. And the difference is if you continue the conversation, it remembers the wrong answer that it gave you. And it's gonna take that into consideration when it's doing the next thing. If you go back and use the little edit button, the little pencil thing, and change the prompt, and then ask it to go ahead and generate it, it forgets the wrong answer, which you want it to forget. And so I. The only big difference between doing this in Jasper other than some of the stuff that, that Ashley mentioned is that here, that the down the thumb down vote tells it in the long run that this is not what we wanna get when we're trying to plan an event that Chachi PT will not remember because you're starting a brand new chat. So that's the only difference. But everything else you can really do with a very detailed prompt, like this one with a very clear process leading into this, like the one Ashley's sharing. you can do that on any

Ashley Gross:

other platform. Thank you. That was a good call out. So in addition to that, since I didn't like the input, I thumbed down it, thumbs down it, that's not right. I disliked it. I had to talk that through. Sorry. but I also don't like the next one that it generated as well. It's, they're getting better. But just for kind of a frame of reference on Jas, where you can click speed or quality, I've been clicking speed this whole entire time. which basically means it'll just generate outputs faster, but the quality might not be as good. So I changed it to quality. Now, I also clicked enhanced prompt. So this immediately, forces it to give itself context so that you don't have to, so again, I didn't like the prompt two times. Now I don't wanna give it more context. I want it to help itself and learn. So let's see if we get a better one now. Here we go. Okay. Metropolitan areas, just as a reminder is the, geographical location that we decided on. So it gave me McCormick Place, which is in Chicago, Hilton, which is in Canada, and then another convention center in California. Okay, great. I like that it gives me like a little bit of history too. Once it stops generating, you'll be able to see it, but here we go. And this is typically why I stick with the speed and not quality. I'm more of like an instant gratification type of AI user.

Isar Meitis:

Are we all these days?

Ashley Gross:

And you'll notice this as Ashley's brand voice. something else while we're waiting on this is, you can pick which brand voice you use. So if I want it to sound like me, I actually copied in my LinkedIn profile and it analyzed my voice and tone for all of my posts. And that's my brand voice. So it's not gonna sound like an AI machine. It's gonna sound like me.

Isar Meitis:

and to pause you on that, yes, for a second. That's something I'm doing, and my team is doing on Chachi PT and Claude two as well. And the way we do this, we literally created a long prompt that tells us how we write what we like with a few examples. We save it as a segment of a prompt in magical that we use every time before we generate anything. So now I have Isar personal and I have Isar business and I can use them whenever I want to use them, when I don't wanna sound like plain vanilla Chachi pt, but I wanna sound more like Isar with my experience and my little, weightiness and et cetera. And it will sound a lot more like me and a lot less like an ai. And you can do, again, you can do this here. Absolutely. It's built into the system. Jasper is amazing that way. Both means of personal branding as well as a corporate brand that you will keep in line with. But you can do similar things with a little more work on any large language model out

Ashley Gross:

there. I don't know about you, but there's like certain words that just make me cringe. Like synchronous and synchrony and the other like overused words. So I even take it a step further and tell it not to use those words and replace it because I just, I'm, I wouldn't say

Isar Meitis:

that with, I'm the same with like fancy, really formal thank yous at the end of emails and stuff. Yeah. I'm like, I'm not, I'm the cheers kind of guy versus the with best amazing regards. with respectfully that's, I will never say something like that. So I tell it not to use these things and then it never does. Yep.

Ashley Gross:

Okay. So here are the three options. and it gave me like a little bit of history. I'm personally gonna choose the McCormick place, and something else that you'll notice. So if you go all the way down to the bottom of this, it's got references, so that's nice. So if you don't trust it, I know sometimes people are a little bit weary, as they should be about the fact checking. you can always ask it for references if it doesn't provide them for you. I am going to say, and I would, I'm just gonna do this in live time so you can see what terrible prompt I put in and how it enhances it easily. So I'm gonna say I like option one. plan an event. Nope. Plan a panel discussion for this convention and provide the topics and a budget. Nope. And a meal plan for a hundred attendees on a budget of$150,000. I'll also mention I misspell so many things on here, and God bless Jasper, because it doesn't matter. Like it knows what I'm trying to say and I don't even think you can like, expect that from people. okay, I switched it to quality and I asked it to enhance this prompt. So again, act as an event planner, organize a panel discussion. Create a meal plan. You saw the small, crappy prompt I put

Isar Meitis:

in and the enhancement. So I get two for the people who are just listening to this. After the fact, Ashley gave it one sentence. We got two full paragraphs of a much more detailed prompt that is based on a, her understanding of who Ashley is from history, but also on this entire process that we have done together in the last 30 minutes

Ashley Gross:

or so. Yep. And I just asked it to create a meal plan, but when I've done this for a live event in the past, I actually put in dietary restrictions and asked it to create me, meal plans based off the dietary restrictions and the budget restrictions, which is really nice. okay. It is thinking and hopefully not thinking.

Isar Meitis:

So for those of you who don't know the joke of thinking versus thunking, this comes from, oh, I'm gonna butcher her name, but she is an executive at Google, Google and her name ex escapes me right now, but she wrote this piece. What is it? Cassie? Yeah, Cassie. She has like a really fancy, crazy title, like the head of Decision Making in Google or Strategic Decisions in Google. Yes. Which is means she's a really smart cookie and she's really an amazing person and she's really smart. And she wrote this piece about thinking versus thunking, meaning she's talking about the fact that AI is gonna replace all the thunking, meaning all this stuff, right? All the tedious research and putting together documents and plans, like all this stuff that is not thinking, assisting us humans that do the thinking and replacing all the thunking that we do not want to do. And hence the mention of the thunking several times during this conversation. This is where it comes from. So thank you, Cassie, for putting terminology to what we think and not thank.

Ashley Gross:

Exactly. Okay. So it created a high level agenda, which is what I asked it to do for my panelists. So an introduction and then the discussion round one. we're gonna ask each panelist to share their thoughts on the current state of industry. we can either pick technology or marketing and future prospects. The panelists will dive into the innovations and technological advancements shaping the industry, sustainable practices and responsible growth. This sounds great. And then q and as, this is sounds like your typical panel discussion and formatting, and I like that it gives me the timing breakdown. From there, I asked it to create a gourmet experience. I didn't, I asked it to create me a meal plan on a budget, but it just automatically thought and got more creative and gourmet experience sounds way better. So appetizers and assortment of bite-sized delights, including regional ingredient infused bruschetta and vegan spring rolls. Love it. entrees are gonna be herb crusted, salmon stuffed ravioli and vegan stew. Don't love the vegan stew, but that's okay. Someone else out there will desserts are chocolate mousse, or as sorbet. And then they gave me drinks. So wine, beer, and non-alcoholic beverages. Okay, from here all I have to do is dive into the specifics and the talk track, and then come up with an invitation and send it. That says everything that this beautiful machine just created in the last 20 minutes. But I didn't, I spent 20 minutes on this. That's it.

Isar Meitis:

So first of all, I wanna say, Ashley, this is, Fricking incredible. Like literally the first of all, the thought process. It's very obvious, and I wanna say something that goes back to the thunking versus thinking part of things. It comes with a lot of experience, meaning the fact you can do this now in, I don't know, 30 minutes that we have done this is because you A, have pulled off a few events in your past, and B has been training this particular machine to do these things again and again. So yes, there is magic, but this magic comes with knowledge and experience that you need to bring into this. Like it's garbage in garbage. Add good data in, great results out. But putting that as a given, you can do things today and now you can take this to literally any company process. It does not have to be a marketing process. This can be how do we write better proposals to win more RFPs? Go through the same process, okay, what have we done previously that has worked? Who we need on our team? what kind of expertise we need on our team to win more business in this particular niche that we're in? Who are these people? Can we offer them jobs? Where do they live? What would make it more attractive to them? How much money they make? Like literally you can go down through a similar process with almost any business process that is in the knowledge world, meaning it's not gonna put more raw material on your production floor tomorrow. It can probably help you, by the way, with supply chain management maybe. So there is the knowledge process side of things of almost everything in business. And if you follow the same concepts that Ashley shared with us today on. An incredible value on its own, but I'm saying now, generalize it to any process in your business and think about, okay, we know what needs to happen. How can we build this process back and forth multiple times. But then in three weeks, four weeks, a month, a quarter, you can do this magic that used to take weeks, literally weeks involving, I don't know, four to 10 different people and cost you a hell of a lot of money because some of these people are external consultants and now one person can do them in an hour and let's say, okay, this was a game we were playing with a fictitious company. Okay, A day, it's still comparing two weeks of multiple people is a very big difference. The other thing that I wanna say, and I said that in the beginning, at the end of the day, there's people in the business and there's people in the clients, and this doesn't stand in a vacuum. Meaning if you really wanna make this successful, This should be, and maybe every single step or maybe a bunch of steps together as, okay, I'm gonna put my team together and we're gonna wanna review two or three options that this thing gave us. And we're gonna decide on one of those options and then we'll continue the process. So selecting the venue, that's a big deal because it will mean location and mean. How would you get there? It means budgeting, it means travel. It means how many people do we, can we fit in there? Either is it too big or too, it's like there's other things in a business that comes into putting an event together, but you're not starting with a blank piece of paper on anything. Like you're pretty far into a good direction before you have the first meeting on any of those status meetings. And to be completely fair with these tools, now these status meetings that used to take weeks can be a hackathon. Like you can literally have the relevant people in the room for one day or half a day, and at the end of that half a day, You are ready with the list of people, with the event, with the, what you're gonna serve as food, which then, okay, now you send out to five different caterers in the Quebec area, whichever location we picked, and you get quotes and you move on from there. So it's an incredible way to take really complex, long business processes and shorten them, not by 20%, but by 95% with significantly less budget. So now I wanna open it to questions, I'll ask the first question and then maybe more people will jump in. how long did it take you to get from, and you said years of using Jasper, but this particular process of finding personas and finding the people on LinkedIn and then creating this, how long did this take before you honed it into the, I don't know if it's perfection, but the very good state it is in right now?

Ashley Gross:

yeah, I started using AI because I wasn't confident in my tone and talking to executives like, this is how I started this process is not where I'm at right now. So I just wanna emphasize, I did not go in and know what I was going to do with it. I went in very blind. I would say all together it took me one time of trying it, to really like, understand and then build on that. I always started with just verifying. in my company we have our buyer personas, so I would ask it and test it, and then I would compare it to what we have. And then as I started to trust it, I would build off of that and grow, but not long at all.

Isar Meitis:

so Perfect. Then I wanna say two things on what you said. One is don't be afraid to experiment. Like a lot of people, I don't know what it's gonna do. Okay, then try or you don't know what to do. so first of all, find maybe the most important thing when it comes to the whole AI thing is education. find the right people. if you're listening to this podcast, it's a good step forward. I'm tapping myself on the shoulder, but the find the people you trust who bring real value to you consistently. That has real experience. People like Ashley did not do this for fun. She's really doing this thing for a business. Throwing actual events for people that drive growth for her company. find these kind of people who are not just hype and oh, okay, here's a hundred amazing prompts to do this and that, but people who are real practitioners and follow them and see what they're doing. So keep on educating yourself, but there's no way of making this successful for your use case, for your business, for your personality without actually getting your hands dirty. So that's number one. Number two, when you're getting your hands dirty, do it in a safe sandbox. Ashley said in the beginning, she didn't just hit send. It's okay, let's see if this even makes sense. are these personas aligned with the real personas that we, as the thinkers of the business, agreed that are the personas we want to go after? That we as the marketers of the business think that is the right tone to approach those people. So you have to experiment, but you have to experiment safely in the beginning, whatever that thing is. And as you develop it and develop trust in a few things, and I'll say another thing that is very important here, because somebody will do this and then they're gonna call me back and send me an email and say, Hey, what the hell? Even when you develop trust with these platforms, they will surprise you. They will pull something stupid out of thin air and they'll make it sound extremely convincing. So it happens to me at least once or twice a week every week where it will sneak in something within a lot of stuff that is perfect and accurate. That is complete bss, and it will do it in the same amount of detail and the same level of, quote unquote. confidence as all the stuff that is real. And so you have to be aware all the time that these will hallucinate and they will pull stuff in the most unexpected places. So you still have to have the right safeguards from a business process perspective in order to make sure you're not shooting yourself in the foot. But that's why I said start safe. Start with internal projects. Okay. So I'm doing this internal project with 95% ai and I'm gonna encourage everybody in the business involved in this internal project to use AI in this way. And if we break it up, then okay, it's an internal project. We've learned a lot. And then from there you start with small client projects and then you continuously grow from there. Exactly. There's a question from Chris on why Jasper

Ashley Gross:

So I see a couple of these questions. So Jasper was actually before ChatGPT. so I don't want to just say that though because I use Jasper over ChatGPT for many reasons. personally, we, I rolled out, AI in all of our marketing departments. So I was swimming in SS e c compliance and data protection agreements. so just from a security standpoint, I really like Jasper. I also am a firm believer in being intentional. I love technology, but it changes every day. So I really grilled their head of product on what their product roadmap looked like and what they were going to do. Because if I'm going to encourage everyone to use AI and I'm going to use it in my day-to-day, I wanna know that it's not just here for the short term. I wanna know that I'm gonna be able to make this last. And the low longevity of it and sustainability of it was really important to me. So that was a really long way of saying why I chose as over Hitachi pt. And I hope that was helpful and

Isar Meitis:

I'll add on top of that. in the long run and even now, There are two completely separate paths to all of this. One is the general large language models, which are, by the way, the underlying engine for most of the stuff you're gonna use. So very few companies can develop their own models because it's insanely expensive. So that's number one. But so there's gonna be that general direction, and then there's gonna be the optimized for X model. And that could be optimized for a specific type of medicine. And it could be specific to a specific branch of marketing, and it could be specific to writing code or maybe two writing JavaScript. there's going to be these very specialized, better trained, optimized for specific things, models. And Jasper is a great example of that. It's a model that is optimized for marketing, for doing the kind of stuff that Ashley's doing with this for creating blogs and social media posts and so on. This is what it's optimized to do. So in that particular thing, it's gonna perform much better than it will that compared with just ChatGPT. That's number one. Number two is the user interface. As I mentioned several times during this conversation, you can do most of this with ChatGPT with a lot more work. Now. Can you simplify the work with some of the tricks that I mentioned? Yes, it's still gonna be more work and less user friendly, meaning people like me, people like Ashley can probably figure it out. People are your regular, normal employee in the company, maybe in the longer run, but if you wanna get quick wins, give people something that has the user interface, the ease of use and the process that is aligned with what they're used to doing. It's gonna make their life a lot easier and your adoption success is gonna be much better. Joseph, you had something to add or to ask? Please go ahead. I'm Joseph, actually I just want to ask you in the beginning, Do you have a framework or a formula that helps you get started? How was it like?

Ashley Gross:

Chaos because it wasn't mainstream yet? no. I did not have a framework when I got started because it was not very popular. and there was not a lot of people using it, and it was a little bit more taboo than it is now. I would highly recommend using frameworks now. There's prompts everywhere. Jasper gives theirs away for free as well. they also have a free, just basic level training, and I'm sure other AI models do as well. So if I had frameworks, I absolutely would've used them and taken advantage of them. but yeah, I did not,

Isar Meitis:

I'll add one more thing to that and then we're running out of time, so one thing, and I said that before, is education. Like you have to educate yourself and your team. And if it's a business, the best way to do that is to build a console, like a number of people who are in charge of AI across the business, who are consistently listening, watching, learning, and building an education plan for the rest of the people across the company on the different aspects of the company. So there's gonna be different training for people in marketing, then there's gonna be in finance versus operations versus DevOps, right? Depending on which company you're in. But keeping the knowledge coming in and training the people consistently because this thing is moving not just fast, but faster every single week. And so keeping on track with the latest technology and the capabilities is very important. The flip side of that, and I will say that because Ashley mentioned that, and that's critically important and very smart, which is. There are probably hundreds of new AI based tools coming out every single day, and some of them are really cool and some of them can solve really interesting problems. At the end of the day, it's a business and there is business strategy and there is risk assessment, and there's implementation across teams and processes, and that has to come first. if you just allow your employees to go wild and say, yeah, go find crazy tools and use them, that's chaos. That's real chaos, not the chaos that Ashley was talking about. Ashley, chaos. That's business chaos, which leads to really bad results. If on the flip side you're saying, We are gonna define business goals. We're gonna assign these goals to a committee, to a group of people that are gonna be in charge of finding AI tools. And these people will think like Ashley, meaning is this tool, is this new startup that has this really cool tool gonna be around two years from now? Because we're gonna invest four months in deploying this across the company, and then two months later they're out of business. we have a freaking problem. So in a business context, you have to think business strategy, operations, implementation, education, customer service, like all these things that come into a business before you jump in into any new cool thing while you are evaluating every new cool thing. Because even if this company is gonna fail in doing this, somebody bigger, more stable with the right roadmap will take it because it's a great idea. And then maybe you want to use that tool. Yes. I wanna think,

Ashley Gross:

go ahead, Ashley. No, I was just gonna say, if I may leave you with one piece of advice, it would be to be intentional. I think that's a great place to land on it. And if you are in a leadership role at a company and you are trying to roll this out, trust comes from the top. So you have to be doing the same work that you're asking your employees to do. So just wanted to leave you with that. I think it's really important to mention.

Isar Meitis:

Ashley, one last thing. Before I thank you again. if people wanna follow you, find you know more about you, about your company, how do they do that?

Ashley Gross:

Yes. It's just Ashley, a gross on LinkedIn. Please feel free to follow me. I love ai. I will nerd out and talk to you about it all day long. I will, I promise you I will.

Isar Meitis:

So thanks everybody for joining us live. So the 20 people plus we had here on the call, plus the, I don't know how many people on LinkedIn live. I really appreciate you spending the time with us. I hope. You found this valuable. We are gonna try to do this, and this has been successful so far, every other week on Thursday at noon. This seems to be a good time and a lot of people are joining every time we do this, and we're gonna keep on bringing people as brilliant as Ashley. And so thank everybody for joining us from wherever you are in the world. And Ashley, thank you again for a, what you're doing, b for sharing everything that you're doing. It's not a given. I don't take this for granted. I really appreciate you and appreciate you taking the time and sharing this with us.

Ashley Gross:

Thank you.

Isar Meitis:

Wow. Right. Incredible. Really, really incredible. once you start thinking outside the box and you're trying to look for the places where generative AI can really do. Incredible things for us. As far as improving processes, you're not getting a 10 percent efficiency gains. You're getting 10, 000 percent efficiency gains as Ashley just shared with us. And I really hope that you'll be able to generalize either with the comments that I provided or on your own to other areas of your business where you can do the same thing. Before we dive into this week's news, I would like to ask a small favor. If you like the podcast, if you enjoyed this episode, please share it with other people that can benefit from it and give us a review on your favorite podcasting platform that helps us reach more people and helps you be a part of a better AI world. If you found this particular episode helpful and you're looking to join us live so you can ask questions on our next live session, just connect with me on LinkedIn. We publish these as live events on LinkedIn. It happens roughly every other Thursday where we bring a practitioner like Ashley and dive into very tactical ways to leverage AI in a business. And now let's dive to this week's news. There've been some huge announcements this week. And we'll start with two that come from Microsoft. Microsoft announced, two different things. One is that their copilot 365 program is going to become available to anybody who is going to purchase it starting November 1st. So it's literally just around the corner. This is obviously huge because it means that you can have AI at your fingertips at more or less every single thing every employee does. in your business. Now, are businesses ready for that? Absolutely not. I think there's very few businesses, if any, that even understand the implications of what this means. This means that writing emails, creating presentations, responding to stuff, analyzing data, all of that becomes significantly better and faster and yet a lot riskier if there's no clear guidelines, instructions, processes, oversight, and most importantly, strategy and education for your employees. So if I have to urge one thing to you, if you are in business, in any position, either go to your management or if you are in management and say, Hey, this thing is coming, we'll have it available. It has incredible benefits, but as a company, we have to put the right processes, the right guardrails, the right. strategy in order to actually make this efficient versus shooting ourselves in the foot. And if you think that shooting yourself in the foot is not something that can happen, well, let's go back to Microsoft as well from this week. Two employees from Microsoft AI research team exposed 38 terabytes of private data that includes backups of their workstation. as they were publishing stuff to GitHub as part of their open source effort that exposed data secrets, private keys, passwords, and 30, 000 internal Microsoft team messages. So if you think that Microsoft does not have guardrails in place to try to prevent these kinds of things, well, you're probably wrong. And now allowing AI to do some of these processes because they're going to be at the fingertips of every single employee. Think about the level of exposure it puts every single organization. So if Microsoft can run into a situation like this. You might too, and your organization might as well. And so, putting the right strategies, guardrails, and team in place to figure this out before you allow all your employees to try using this is a great idea. On the other hand, if you do figure this out and you understand how to do this safely, you can gain a huge gain over your competition as we've seen as an example in today's episode. Let's stay on one last piece of news on Microsoft. Microsoft just announced Windows 11 and Windows 11, probably the most significant version of Windows, maybe ever. And the reason is it will have AI connected to everything. So just like they announced Copilot for Microsoft Office, they're now announced Copilot for everything Windows, meaning you'll be able to use the power of generative AI with everything within your computer. You'll be able to ask questions about your data. You'll be able to produce documents. You'll be able to produce imagery. You'll be able to remove backgrounds from screenshots. You'll be able to summarize documents, web pages, conversations. Anything you can imagine because it's going to be baked into the actual operating system of your computer. So take what we said on Microsoft 365 and now quadruple that because it's going to be connected to literally everything on your computer and that's coming out now on Windows 11. So buckle up, it's going to be a very, very interesting ride. Another big player that made a huge large language model announcement is Amazon. Amazon just announced that Alexa is going to be powered by a new large language model that Amazon claims is going to provide it superpowers that even ChatGPT doesn't have because in addition to just be able to answer questions you'll be able to Do things for you because of the things Alexa is already connected to because it has access to the internet and so on this is not surprising. It's obviously interesting news. And I've, I mentioned that several times on the show before I expect Siri and Alexa and Google home to do all these things just the same and take those large language models, combine them to everything they're doing today, combining it with all the devices they're connected to, and allow you to be really conversational with everything you need in your house and with these personal assistants, I think in the very near future, within months, we'll be able to do really magical things with them. And the first one that made the announcement that it's becoming available is Amazon. Another huge announcement this week is open AI just unveiled Dall-E3. Dal E is their text to image generator. It actually came out before ChatGPT in 2022. Dall-E3 is coming out imminently. It's rolling out to the paid members as we speak, and the biggest difference between that and all the previous models is that it's gonna be a part of ChatGPT, meaning it's really a multi-modal capability that allows you to chat back and forth while you're creating the image. This is a huge benefit compared to using existing system like Stable Diffusion or Dali two, or even Mid Journey. And there's two main reasons. Reason number one is that you can write much longer and more detailed prompt Compared to what you can do with a standalone text to image generators. But the other reason is a lot deeper and a lot more profound is the fact that it understands the context and it's a part of the conversation. Meaning it understands roles. It understands what you're trying to create. It understands the part of the project that it's in, and you can go back and forth and adding and changing and manipulating the image because it's a part of a conversation. In addition, they obviously improved the model. So now you can create much better images than you can create with DALI 2 before. So I expect DALI 3 to be a huge hit. I'm personally really excited to start playing with it as soon as it comes out and compare it to what currently is my number one pick mid journey. I will keep you posted as I test things out. And the last really big piece of news that I'm going to share with you today is That rumors are hinting that Google is getting ready to release Gemini. Gemini is their nuclear version of large language model battle with open AI. That's what's supposed to put them back on the map. Everything Google has done so far in the AI battle against open AI has been In simple terms, disappointing. I mean, BARD's capabilities do not come even close to what ChachiPT or even CloudTooth from Anthropic. and even on the web side of things, I find that Bing is actually doing a better job across multiple things. So, very big disappointment from Google so far. That being said, Google has access to more data than anyone, and definitely budgets for both the best people and the best chips on the planet. And hence, I am certain that what they're baking is very, very interesting. Gemini is said to be a real multimodal AI model that will be able to handle graphs and images and text, etc. In a very good way, and it also leverages, as we mentioned, Google's access to a lot more data than anybody else has, including stuff that nobody else has access to, such as data from Android devices and YouTube. So I expect Gemini to finally put Google at par with open AI. And the reason I want that is I want us all to have options of different tools to choose from, because it will give us end users more options to choose from and over time, we'll probably make it more accessible and cheaper for us to use advanced capabilities. That being said, I'm terrified with how fast these things are moving and the fact that this is another quantum leap forward by another really big player will force everybody else to move forward even faster without any real guardrails at this point. So with this, not so positive note, but the reality of where we are in the AI world today. I encourage you to go and test AI systems, try different use cases, learn about it as much as you can, share it with other people, because if we keep on sharing, we help the world, we help society get more ready for this tsunami that is coming, and until next time, have an amazing week.